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With the burning of the oil in the gulf, I have a few concerns.
I know and knew some people who were greatly affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. It seems like so long ago. 1989. The Supreme court finally ruled and people devastated by the negligence of this coroperation finally recieved their "compensation" 23 years later. The "compensation" after the courts got done was about ten cents on the dollar.

So here we are twenty four years later and I see it happening it again. It saddens me. I see the government hasn't done some of the things that were learned. They are supposed to have an environmental assessment team on site immediately. Yet it seem all they are worried about is what happens if the oil reaches shore and not the damage to the wildlife in the ocean. If you like shrimp I would be eating it sooner than later.

While I realize burning is the best way to handle the oil slick and it is better to keep it off shore, it's just the idea that this is nothing more than the cost of doing business. Just as with the Massey mine calamity.

I was wondering after the supreme court ruling, where corporations have the rights of an individual shouldn't they now have the same responsibility. If you spill oil in the water from a fishing boat you can lose your boat. I just think it is time that the people incharge of these corporations be held responsible. If the corporation is neglectful then the officers and board members should be charged.

I am more or less just venting here but would like to here what everyone thinks.


Tags: Oil, spill

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I think you are spot on Bull. First, find out exactly what caused this environmental disaster, then hold responsible parties feet to the fire!
If corporations have the rights of individuals, then they should be subject to capital punishment. Execute them by taking their capital away!
I don't know if there was negligence, but we hear how these wells have blow out presenters and they will never lose a drop of oil. I do hope they figure out what went wrong. I also feel bad for the families of the eleven people that were lost.
Last weekend we toured the Ocean Star Offshore Drilling Rig and Museum. It was really interesting. One of the main exibits was the "Blow Out Preventer". It sure convinced me that what is currently happening, couldn't happen. I wonder if the people in Mass. would rather have an off shore drilling platform or the windmills.
I remember when Richard Nixon appointed a person he thought was an oil man as secretary of the interior. One off shore leak and he shut down all the rigs off Santa Monica California and stopped all leasing. One of the more courageous political moves I ever saw. Of course Nixon fired him. But he couldn't reopen it because it by that time was to politically hot.
That kind of political courage has been hard to find in the environmental area for a long time. My feeling is that no corporation should be exempt from the rules.
Bull said: I don't know if there was negligence, but we hear how these wells have blow out presenters and they will never lose a drop of oil. I do hope they figure out what went wrong. I also feel bad for the families of the eleven people that were lost. (End of Bull's quote)

I was humbled and awed by your charity, Bull, and wanted to think about this statement a bit. Negligence is a tough issue. Legally they may not be negligent (failing to act with care and precaution), but as adults we are still responsible for our actions, be they accidents or not. Driving while alcoholically impaired is negligent and if we fall asleep at the wheel and hit a building we are still responsible for what we have done. I think if we are transporting toxic materials, then even with all due prudence and care we need to be held to a higher standard (This is an ethical rather than legal argument). The costs of the potential (albeit unlikely) failure may simply outweigh the benefits. I doubt there is such a thing as a perfect blow-out preventer. Frankly when you are dealing with people and technology - well, parts fail, installation can be flawed, and people make mistakes. And I too feel terrible for the people, wildlife and misery that this leak will cause.
Bull said: "this is nothing more than the cost of doing business." Exactly right.

The oil companies and their insurance companies are financially prepared for correcting disasters like this. If they're not, they should be legally obliged to have enough insurance coverage, just as we are legally obliged to have liability insurance for our cars.
Larry said "Bull said: "this is nothing more than the cost of doing business." Exactly right.

The oil companies and their insurance companies are financially prepared for correcting disasters like this. If they're not, they should be legally obliged to have enough insurance coverage, just as we are legally obliged to have liability insurance for our cars." (end quote from Larry)

Well maybe, but no amount of money can compensate for the loss of lives of the people and wild life that perish in such disasters.
This was the other shoe I waited to drop. Like the Exxon Valdez low balling estimates is very common in these kind of events. Five times more oil 1000 barrels to 5000 barrels 42,000 to 210,000 gallons/day.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/business/energy/6979467.html
Officials have been estimating the well is leaking at least 1,000 barrels, or 42,000 gallons, every day, but on Wednesday night raised the top range to 5,000 barrels
Geez, That is enough oil to run my RV for at least a week!
Sounds like you may not want to go to your normal haunts though, The gulf beaches may not be the same.

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